My First Week Writing for Textbroker

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Yesterday was payday, and it was the end of my first week writing for Textbroker.

In case you aren’t familiar, Textbroker (TB) is a kind of “middle-man” between freelance writers and clients. Clients post orders for content, web copy, product descriptions, or any number of other needs they may have. TB authors (freelance writers like me) accept and complete these orders for a certainbfee per word. TB charges clients a fee for this service. While it may not be the best paying work in the world, it is honestly a pretty good set-up for everybody involved.

I read about TB on another writer’s blog and decided to apply. A few extra dollars are always welcome at our house.

TB asked me to fill out some basic information, submit a writing sample, and send them a “selfie” of me with my driver’s license to prove I am a U.S. citizen (I blocked out my license number and the dates). About 24 hours later, I received an email saying I had been accepted as a Level 4 author.
With TB, your rating level is super important. TB editors read your writing and give you a rating based on grammar, spelling, and overall quality. The higher your level, the more money you are paid per word and the more orders you are eligible to accept. Authors can move up or down rating levels based on the quality of their work. Level 4 is the highest level authors at which authors can be hired. There is a Level 5, but you have to be promoted to that level after you have started writing for them and can pass their proofreading test.

Since, from what I have gathered, most writers start out on TB as Level 2 or Level 3 authors, I was pretty happy to be hired on at Level 4.

Once I was accepted as a TB author, I had to fill out a simple W-9 tax form and email it to them. This was no big deal, and it was just so they could legally pay me for my work.

At that point, I was able to accept my first order.

There are three basic types of orders on Textbroker:

 

    • Open Orders

 

    • Direct Orders

 

    • Team Orders

 


Orders clients place in the open pool for authors to accept are Open Orders. Clients decide which quality level they need or can afford, and any TB author with that level rating or above can accept the order. 

If a client likes a specific author’s work, they can send Direct Orders privately to that author. Authors set their own rates for these orders.

Some clients form teams of authors to work on orders for them. They post orders for the authors on their team to complete.

One of the fun things about TB is the wide variety of orders from which you may choose. In my first week, a few of the topics I have written on include:

 

    • Flossing with braces

 

    • Why vehicles need oil changes

 

    • Synthetic oil vs. regular oil

 

    • Having an MRI

 

    • Pregnancy health

 

    • The 2017 Ford Focus

 

    • Applying for S.S. Disability

 

    • National Children’s Dental Health Month

 

    • Effects of high blood sugar

 

    • Product descriptions for maxi skirts

 

    • Moving company web pages

 

    • Montessori preschools

 

    • Description of a trade school

 

    • Dangers of having poor oral health

 


At any given time, there may be anywhere from 800-3,000 Open Orders posted in the pool for Level 4 and below. And the topics, as you can see, are very wide ranging.

Over the course of this first week, I have written 30 Open Orders for TB. These orders have ranged from 50 words to nearly 1,000. And I have had one client express an interest in sending me Direct Orders in the future.

Here are some pros and cons I have discovered about writing for TB this week:

PROS

 

    • TB seems to be well-organized, fair, and have great author support. Their editors give writing tips to help make your work even better.

 

    • They payout every Friday via PayPal as long as you have earned at least $10 (not hard to do) and requested a payout on Thursday (also not hard to do).

 

    • You get to choose how much or how little you want to write for TB. There are no minimums.

 

    • You choose which orders to accept and when.

 

    • You are paid for every word you write.

 

    • There never seems to be a shortage of work for good writers on TB.

 

    • If you accept an order and realize you cannot complete it by the deadline, you can simply cancel the order without getting in any trouble. It just goes back into the pool.

 

    • Clients must request a revision first before rejecting your work. If a client asks a for a revision and you do not feel you can please them, you may still cancel the order without it affecting your rating level. This removes a lot of stress from fearing rejection right off the bat.

 


CONS

 

    • Clients have up to 4 days to accept your order or request a revision. You do not get paid until the client either accepts your work or 4 days have passed. If you revise an order for a client, they get 4 more days to accept the revision. This can tie up your money on an order for over a week if you have a slow moving client.

 

    • The pay, while very good for companies of its kind, is still low for the writing business. While there are definitely people working on TB full time (especially those on Level 5 and those who are working mostly on Direct or Team Orders) who are making a full time income from it, TB is more like a part time or side job for most writers. I plan to work with TB along with my other various business adventures.

 

    • Everything is ghostwritten under a nickname. That means I get no public author credit for my work and loose all legal rights to anything I am paid to write on TB. I am not even allowed to share my real name or contact info with clients so that they could work with me outside of TB.

 


All in all, I am pretty satisfied to be working with Textbroker. I get to write, I get to work whenever it is convenient for me, I get writing tips from professional editors, and I get paid. If you are already a professional freelance writer looking for new ways to use your talents, or if you just want to learn the ropes of the writing business and would like to make a few bucks along the way, Textbroker might be a great option to consider.


Got questions about writing for Textbroker? I just finished my first week, but I would be glad to give you my honest answers! Leave me a comment below.

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